Direct Mail Campaign From the Insurance Company – Perspective From the Insurance Sales Coach

Most of the insurance companies have direct mail campaigns you can purchase and send to either your prospects or your existing client base. The question is, “Are these direct mail materials worth the investment?” Here's what you should consider before answering that question for you. If you intend to use direct mail to market your…

Most of the insurance companies have direct mail campaigns you can purchase and send to either your prospects or your existing client base. The question is, “Are these direct mail materials worth the investment?” Here's what you should consider before answering that question for you.

If you intend to use direct mail to market your insurance or investment business your success starts with the people who will receive your messages. In an ideal situation you develop your own highly targeted mailing list. If you rent a mailing list rather than renting a list based on something generic like zip codes only rent a list that allows you to add other variables into your list selection. This helps you increase your success with that rented list. You'll pay more for the more targeted rented list, but that list has a far greater likelihood of generating the revenue to pay for the list than a generic list ever could. However, I would never recommend buying a list when you can build a highly responsive list yourself.

The direct mail campaigns you get from the insurance company can produce results if you send out thousands and commit to repeatedly mailing to your list over time. Of course, that means you'll have to rent that purchased mailing list each and every time you want to mail those people and you'll have the cost of the direct mail pieces you send out plus postage. That means you have to make certain the return from your investment is greater than the cost of that investment.

However, you can get great results from direct mail campaigns when those direct mail campaigns are better suited to your business. There are a number of missed opportunities in the direct mail campaigns you can purchase from the insurance carriers. One of the most glaring problems with those marketing pieces is the focus of the message.

The insurance carriers care about selling one of their products not building your business. They do not care if a policy holder buys a policy from you or another agent and that's why their marketing pieces focus on a product. The person receiving your direct mail piece could easily take your marketing piece in hand to their existing agent or any other agent and buy that product from them not you. Thanks for sharing.

Another problem is those marketing pieces tend to be generic rather than specific. The insurance provider has thousands of agents that can sell those marketing campaigns to, but only if those pieces can work for anyone. So rather than focusing on the reason someone would want to do business with you they focus on a generic person with rather generic concerns.

You're just one of over 1.5 million other agents. If there is not a reason to do business with you and you specifically you can expect a poor response to any marketing communication. The receiver needs to know why they should pay attention to you and what you can help them get that special about you and your business.

Finally, asking the receiver to call you for a “free review” or whatever is another missed opportunity. You could increase your response and your sales if the call to action was relevant to what the receiver wants. You act to get what you want. You do not act to get an opportunity to get sold to.